Hanson Brothers Interview
The Hanson Brothers, a side project of Vancouver punk band No Means No, are stepping into the front lines for an upcoming tour. No Means No began in the late 70’s after brothers John and Rob Wright found themselves at a Ramones concert, the same show that co-conspirator Jello Biafra also attended that fateful night.  As with many of their peers this was the beginning of a long relationship with the punk music scene, practicing in mom’s basement and evolving into a real band.

Fast forward to 2014, all three members of No Means No; Rob Wright or Robbie Hanson on bass, guitarist Tommy and drummer John Wright who trades in his custom drum kit to front the HB as lead vocalist. Replacing John on the drums is “Some Guy” Hanson.  Not only is John Wright a talented musician but he is also a passionate home brewer, in fact he is co producing a new brew with Le Trou du Diable brewery, in true punk rock fashion it is called “Johnny Hanson’s Punk Rauch “beer.

What better way then to celebrate a new brew then to tour the Hanson Brothers?  That’s exactly what the band is doing and Toronto is lucky enough to welcome the HB to Lee’s Palace on March 27th.
In anticipation of the show (and a beer tasting) here is a fun little interview with HB Tommy.  Make sure you check them out at Lee’s Palace or any of their other tour dates listed at the bottom.

Cheers!


Tour Dates:
March 26- Ottawa @Mavericks
March 27- Toronto@Lee’s Palace
March 28- London@the Call Office
March29- Kitchener/Waterloo@Starlite
March 30- Hamilton@ClubAbsinthe
March 31- Vankleek HIll@Windsor Tavern
April 1- Quebec City@L’agite
April 2-Shawingan@Saon Wabasso

check out the rest of the dates and more about the band(s) at :
www.nomeanswhatever.com
www.melaniekayepr.com
How are the Hanson Brothers different from No Means No, both in terms of sound and personality of the band?A: Well it is the same trio of neurotics + one other neurotic, Byron Slack who plays guitar with our good chums, Invasives. Byron is drumming with us.
The sound is not that much different, really, same instruments through the same amp. The Hansons music is a little easier to play, as such, but we try to maintain as high a level of tightness and focus as possible with both projects.The Hanson Brothers are a little schticky also. There are the occasional set pieces which we  like to keep in the act. There is a vaudville side there.Do you think it’s hard for people to ever learn about you being a punk band because of your name being associated with that “other boy band”?
It’s actually funny as you are polar opposites!A: I think learning is hard for many people, period. We probably have more in common with the ’other band’ than is commonly supposed: both outfits have had career ups and downs over the years and both bands have continued with their visions. Hanson kept touring and trying to improve as musicians long after the platinum sales. Kudos to them! They may not be my cup   of tea musically but they are real musicians who do it because above all they like playing. I have heard they are putting out a craft beer, as Johnny Hanson is also doing. May confusion ever triumph!
Is there any seriousness to the lyrics and music or is it just about irony and quirkiness?A: There is a serious side to everything and an ironic side and a fatuous side; everything appears outwardly to have two sides but there are always scads of permutations.
To go further in pedanticism: there are more than two sides to every coined phrase; gosh that is terrible.How did you deal with the death of Stompin Tom? Did he know about you?A: I am sorry he passed but death is a common human bond. It always a good thing to remember ”the bones of all men” adage. He did indeed know of us! We made him some royalty money.What is this new record and tour all about?A: About three and a half weeks of shows and beer rather than vinyl at the heart of it all! Hopcore.After all these years of music and touring, what motivates you and what has changed in the business?A: Little has changed in the business, perhaps there is less of it owing to ‘advances’ in technology but nothing really. I think the music business really began to change in the early seventies when concerns such  as the Kinney Shoe company, for one, began to diversify into the music business as the coporate umbrella opened and reigned over all. More of a regression, really. But people want to be in music for the same reasons they always have. Affection, attention, artistic stimulation, the public immolation of goats… I play music because I love to play music - most of the time. Sometimes I go for a few weeks without picking up a guitar. I define myself in many ways by playing music and I should not really.How do you think you have evolved as a band and individually?A: Individually I have probably shrunk half an inch physically. I think I can play with a little more facility than I used to. 16ths still come hard to me. I am not a very fast player. As a band….well, influences both musically and other have changed. I listen to a lot more classical.Have your audiences diversified too or are they just all-older punks?A: We have been lucky  to have had a fairly diverse audience for many  years. We go back to the time when punk rock was not as definable or conservative as it be- came, I think. I would be stoked if people came to our shows leaning on walkers!What does your creative process look like, especially with the new material; how do all work together and get it together?A: We will never really get it together but we are trying. I think, in order to remain as independent as possible and certainly with all possible good intentions we attempted too long to manage ourselves and sometimes that could be detrimantal. We get together and sometimes we annoy each other and most of the time we don’t. The creative process is rarely visible, in my case anyway and when it does choose to appear it does most often in the guise of the shadow of doubt.What’s in your listening bag right now?A: As I write I am listening to Francis Poulenc ‘Les Biches’. I love many pieces of late 19th and 20th century french music. The best 'rock' band I have heard in a long time are The Buildings, from Minneapolis. I am still waiting to get a copy of the new Invasives disc from Byron.We’re having our baseball pool tonight! Probably throw on a Lee Morgan CD at some point. The most recent album by Ford Pier, Huzzah, is also a household favourite of my wife Carrie and I.I’m not just saying this to assauge the sensitive Pier! Although I have every intention of beating him like a rented mule in this pool.Anything you want to tell your fans about yourselves that may surprise or shock them?
A: Shop locally if you can and live by the golden rule. They already know this.

Hanson Brothers Interview

The Hanson Brothers, a side project of Vancouver punk band No Means No, are stepping into the front lines for an upcoming tour. No Means No began in the late 70’s after brothers John and Rob Wright found themselves at a Ramones concert, the same show that co-conspirator Jello Biafra also attended that fateful night.  As with many of their peers this was the beginning of a long relationship with the punk music scene, practicing in mom’s basement and evolving into a real band.

Fast forward to 2014, all three members of No Means No; Rob Wright or Robbie Hanson on bass, guitarist Tommy and drummer John Wright who trades in his custom drum kit to front the HB as lead vocalist. Replacing John on the drums is “Some Guy” Hanson.  Not only is John Wright a talented musician but he is also a passionate home brewer, in fact he is co producing a new brew with Le Trou du Diable brewery, in true punk rock fashion it is called “Johnny Hanson’s Punk Rauch “beer.

What better way then to celebrate a new brew then to tour the Hanson Brothers?  That’s exactly what the band is doing and Toronto is lucky enough to welcome the HB to Lee’s Palace on March 27th.

In anticipation of the show (and a beer tasting) here is a fun little interview with HB Tommy.  Make sure you check them out at Lee’s Palace or any of their other tour dates listed at the bottom.

Cheers!

Tour Dates:

March 26- Ottawa @Mavericks

March 27- Toronto@Lee’s Palace

March 28- London@the Call Office

March29- Kitchener/Waterloo@Starlite

March 30- Hamilton@ClubAbsinthe

March 31- Vankleek HIll@Windsor Tavern

April 1- Quebec City@L’agite

April 2-Shawingan@Saon Wabasso

check out the rest of the dates and more about the band(s) at :

www.nomeanswhatever.com

www.melaniekayepr.com

How are the Hanson Brothers different from No Means No, both in terms of sound and personality of the band?

A: Well it is the same trio of neurotics + one other neurotic, Byron 
Slack who plays guitar with our good chums, Invasives. Byron is 
drumming with us.

The sound is not that much different, really, same instruments 
through the same amp. The Hansons music is a little easier to play, 
as such, but we try to maintain as high a level of tightness and 
focus as possible with both projects.
The Hanson Brothers are a little schticky also. There are the 
occasional set pieces which we  like to keep in the act. There is a 
vaudville side there.



Do you think it’s hard for people to ever learn about you being a 
punk band because of your name being associated with that “other boy band”?

It’s actually funny as you are polar opposites!

A: I think learning is hard for many people, period. We probably have 
more in common with the ’other band’ than is commonly supposed: both outfits have had career ups and downs over the years and both bands have continued with their visions. Hanson kept touring and trying to improve as musicians long after the platinum sales. Kudos to them! They may not be my cup   of tea musically but they are real musicians who do it because above all they like playing. I have heard they are putting out a craft beer, as Johnny Hanson is also doing. May confusion ever triumph!



Is there any seriousness to the lyrics and music or is it just about 
irony and quirkiness?

A: There is a serious side to everything and an ironic side and a 
fatuous side; everything appears outwardly to have two sides but there are always scads of permutations.

To go further in pedanticism: there are more than two sides to every 
coined phrase; gosh that is terrible.


How did you deal with the death of Stompin Tom? Did he know about you?

A: I am sorry he passed but death is a common human bond. It always a 
good thing to remember ”the bones of all men” adage. He did indeed know of us! We made him some royalty money.

What is this new record and tour all about?

A: About three and a half weeks of shows and beer rather than vinyl 
at the heart of it all! Hopcore.

After all these years of music and touring, what motivates you and what has changed in the business?

A: Little has changed in the business, perhaps there is less of it 
owing to ‘advances’ in technology but nothing really. I think the music business really began to change in the early seventies when concerns such  as the Kinney Shoe company, for one, began to diversify into the music business as the coporate umbrella opened and reigned over all. More of a regression, really. But people want to be in music for the same reasons they always have. Affection, attention, artistic stimulation, the public immolation of goats…
 I play music because I love to play music - most of the time. 
Sometimes I go for a few weeks without picking up a guitar. I define 
myself in many ways by playing music and I should not really.



How do you think you have evolved as a band and individually?

A: Individually I have probably shrunk half an inch physically. 
I think I can play with a little more facility than I used to. 16ths 
still come hard to me. I am not a very fast player.
 As a band….well, influences both musically and other have 
changed. I listen to a lot more classical.


Have your audiences diversified too or are they just all-older punks?

A: We have been lucky  to have had a fairly diverse audience for many
  years. We go back to the time when punk rock was not as definable 
or conservative as it be- came, I think. I would be stoked if people came to our shows leaning on walkers!


What does your creative process look like, especially with the new 
material; how do all work together and get it together?

A: We will never really get it together but we are trying. I think, 
in order to remain as independent as possible and certainly with all possible good intentions we attempted too long to manage ourselves and sometimes that could be detrimantal. We get together and sometimes we annoy each other and most of the time we don’t. The creative process is rarely visible, in my case anyway and when it does choose to appear it does most often in the guise of the shadow of doubt.

What’s in your listening bag right now?

A: As I write I am listening to Francis Poulenc ‘Les Biches’. I love 
many pieces of late 19th and 20th century french music. The best 
'rock' band I have heard in a long time are The Buildings, from 
Minneapolis. I am still waiting to get a copy of the new Invasives 
disc from Byron.
We’re having our baseball pool tonight! Probably throw on a Lee 
Morgan CD at some point. The most recent album by Ford Pier, Huzzah, 
is also a household favourite of my wife Carrie and I.
I’m not just saying this to assauge the sensitive Pier! Although I 
have every intention of beating him like a rented mule in this pool.

Anything you want to tell your fans about yourselves that may 
surprise or shock them?


A: Shop locally if you can and live by the golden rule. They already 
know this.

DJ High Voltage Interview


Recently and finally, I got it together and did a long time coming
interview with Jarod Preston. He is known in Toronto as DJ High
Voltage. I met Jarod in my past life as a party promoter and he
played a few of my parties. Always energizing and good vibe
spreading is he. I am proud to present our little interview as my
second blog post. Check him out on Facebook if you want to find
out where and when he may be playing in the near future and get
yourself hooked up to his divine creations! You can hear one of his tracks here: x


How did you get started in DJing?


Chris Sheppard had a huge influence on me. He used to have
two shows on FM 102 where he had a segment called “Shep’s
Premeditated Megamix”. It would be a popular 80’s song
fused with many other songs, and sometimes it went on for
ten minutes. I think I already had a built-in urge to hear more
than one song at a time, but that’s when I decided to dabble in
it myself. I found out many years later that Shep’s Megamixes
were actually created by DJ Paul Dakeyne for the DMC record
pool, which Chris was a subscriber to.
In 1991 my mom bought me a four-channel mixer for
Christmas. The next day I bought my second Discman and
started playing at any house party that would have me. I chose
CD’s over records, partly because I knew they were more
durable, and partly because it was supposed to become the
main format in the clubs. Two years later I was writing for
a music magazine called Renegade Spectrum. The publisher
had a weekly retro night at The Sanctuary, where he gave me
my first recurring guest slot. But the first time I remember
using a DJ CD unit was at my second rave gig at The Zoo Bar
(Funhaus). I bought my own shortly after.


Do you remember the first song that really did it for you?


Cars by Gary Numan. The soaring keyboards really tripped
me out as a seven year old. I used to go to my local roller
skating rink in Whitby called Wheelies, and I was very excited
whenever they played Cars. That, and Crazy Train by Ozzy
Osbourne. LOL

What are you doing presently?

I just finished recording my first video demo for YouTube /
Vimeo debuts. I can’t wait to see the finished product. I’m also
arranging my first podcast of the year. Its part of an ongoing
series called Shock Therapy, where I feature favorite new
tracks, which I think others, will enjoy too. I try to fit as many
styles as I can into 75 minutes. My first release of this name
was a cassette in 1995, and I started the podcast in 2010. I’ve
branded a style called Retronica, which is 80’s influenced EDM,
not unlike the Electroclash movement ten years back. I’ve also
entered a Tears For Fears remix contest on Beatport, and I’m
very pleased with my entry.


Is it hard to get gigs in Toronto?


Yes. There’s a surplus of DJ’s and only a handful of venues. It
was easier in the 90’s when there was at least one major rave
every weekend, and several other options at the same time.
Club owners and promoters tend to hire friends or family
rather than talented strangers. And if they do hire a stranger,
they’re more concerned about the bottom line than sponsoring
a creative endeavor. That’s also something that was better
back in the day. People would follow their hearts a little more.
To be fair, maybe it’s me. Marketing a unique sound can be
tough. It’s like showing everyone a platypus and saying “this is
the ideal pet for you”. It’s a tough sell.


What do you do to (survive) feed both your belly and your
musical passion?


I am determined. And I’m very excitable when it comes to new
sounds. Also I have a day job. It’s comforting to have a steady
income, benefits, and more job security than most.


How has the Toronto dance music scene evolved (or dissolved)
from when you got into DJing to the present culture?


When I started going to raves in ’92 it was ideal for someone
with a short attention span like myself. Every hour was a
different style. Then I watched as all the different camps
developed. Trance. Jungle. Happy Hardcore. For years it was
fractured. One scene would turn their nose up at another. But it
all seems to be coming back together again lately. Open format
is a little more accepted now. There was also the sea change
with the crackdown on warehouse parties. But even the more
alternative styles eventually found a home in the clubs.


What’s your favorite stuff to play right now?


I like variety more than any one style. And I love exposing
people to something new. I like the tech funk of Elite Force.
I like the Suicide Dub family of High Rankin, Hostage, and
Racknruin. I love the drumstep of Twisted Individual and
Urban Assault. And because of my natural urge to combine
songs, I love a good mash up. Colatron and The Reborn Identity
have kept me amused with mashes for quite some time. I think
mash ups are generally underrated in Toronto. That being
said, I think Girl Talk is overrated. I think a DJ should be able
to mix in key. And to not constantly resort to hip hop and R&B
samples.


How has Depeche Mode affected your life?


In an insidious way! As an impressionable youth in the 80’s I
appreciated their sense of style. Their fusion of Goth and synth
pop. Their two tone denim and leather look. Their beautiful
and quirky videos. I may enjoy more songs by The Smiths
or The Cure, but almost everything I listen to has strains of
Depeche Mode in it. I never intended to produce nine Depeche
Mode remixes / mashes, and yet they just came to me, one by
one.


Describe your personal creative process and how it
becomes something that you can put back out there?


I always say I use three ears when I listen to something. The
first is to decide if I like something or not. The second is for
deciding if anyone else will like it besides me, and what impact
it will have in a club. And the third is for figuring out what sort
of music it is and how it relates to other things I’ve collected.


How do you make a song yours, putting your magic and
unique touch on someone else’s composition?


Sometimes I’ll like most of a track, but not all of it. Or I think
it’s too leftfield to be effective in a club. If I think it’s worth my
time, I’ll make a custom edit / remix. That’s where those come
from. Then there’s the mash ups. I have a long list of songs
that remind me of other songs. They just jump out at me. But
when I remix a song I really have to focus on a theme or goal,
otherwise I would never finish. In any case, I often build a track
from front to back, like a DJ set. I think I generate the most
impact that way.


What distinguishes High Voltage from every other DJ?


I know the difference between what I like, and what other
people will probably like. I recognize that there’s sometimes
a difference between art and entertainment. But most of all, I
give a shit about what you want to hear. And I like to make an
impression.


Inspirations, interests outside of music?


None. Seriously though, I believe that laughter is the best
medicine, so comedy is a must. You can hear it in my sets, and
some of my productions. I love good food. If that makes me a
foodie then so be it. And science fiction. Because I’m not just a
music nerd. I’m all kinds of nerd!


How do you get a crowd going in a club, does it bug you
when people make requests?


Nostalgia is king. I like to play things that toy with everyone’s
collective memory. But I have to be careful not to insult those
memories! I actually like taking requests. Sometimes the
audience gives me a better idea than what I had in mind. But
I despise demands. There are always a few people who don’t
comprehend that there might be a certain theme for the night.
And there’s usually some jerk who will give me a lot of grief if I
don’t play their song.


Who is in your listening bag right now, anyone to watch out
for, exciting music trends?


There’s another revival in old rave sounds circa 1992-1994.
Part of it comes from hardcore artists who play at the Bang
Face parties in England like DJ Producer, Panacea and Luna
C. Part of it can be heard on new compilations from Intensive
Recordings. And still another part comes from the Future
Jungle movement by artists like DJ Fresh and 601.


If you could collaborate with any artist, who would it be?


I would love to produce The Prodigy… and of course Depeche
Mode. Locally I’d love to play with Marty McFly because of my
love for breaks. Also Denise Benson, because of her open minds
/ open format policy. The only party we played together was
actually a Surlygrrrl party! But that was ages ago.


Tell people one thing that they may not know about Jarod?


I was married at an Italian villa on a cliff overlooking the Indian
Ocean, near a small jungle village named Takaungu. I know
it sounds fantastic, but it’s true. I was married in Kenya, but
am once again single. Best wedding I’ve ever been to though.
Obviously.

DJ High Voltage Interview

Recently and finally, I got it together and did a long time coming

interview with Jarod Preston. He is known in Toronto as DJ High

Voltage. I met Jarod in my past life as a party promoter and he

played a few of my parties. Always energizing and good vibe

spreading is he. I am proud to present our little interview as my

second blog post. Check him out on Facebook if you want to find

out where and when he may be playing in the near future and get

yourself hooked up to his divine creations! You can hear one of his tracks here: x

How did you get started in DJing?

Chris Sheppard had a huge influence on me. He used to have

two shows on FM 102 where he had a segment called “Shep’s

Premeditated Megamix”. It would be a popular 80’s song

fused with many other songs, and sometimes it went on for

ten minutes. I think I already had a built-in urge to hear more

than one song at a time, but that’s when I decided to dabble in

it myself. I found out many years later that Shep’s Megamixes

were actually created by DJ Paul Dakeyne for the DMC record

pool, which Chris was a subscriber to.

In 1991 my mom bought me a four-channel mixer for

Christmas. The next day I bought my second Discman and

started playing at any house party that would have me. I chose

CD’s over records, partly because I knew they were more

durable, and partly because it was supposed to become the

main format in the clubs. Two years later I was writing for

a music magazine called Renegade Spectrum. The publisher

had a weekly retro night at The Sanctuary, where he gave me

my first recurring guest slot. But the first time I remember

using a DJ CD unit was at my second rave gig at The Zoo Bar

(Funhaus). I bought my own shortly after.

Do you remember the first song that really did it for you?

Cars by Gary Numan. The soaring keyboards really tripped

me out as a seven year old. I used to go to my local roller

skating rink in Whitby called Wheelies, and I was very excited

whenever they played Cars. That, and Crazy Train by Ozzy

Osbourne. LOL

What are you doing presently?

I just finished recording my first video demo for YouTube /

Vimeo debuts. I can’t wait to see the finished product. I’m also

arranging my first podcast of the year. Its part of an ongoing

series called Shock Therapy, where I feature favorite new

tracks, which I think others, will enjoy too. I try to fit as many

styles as I can into 75 minutes. My first release of this name

was a cassette in 1995, and I started the podcast in 2010. I’ve

branded a style called Retronica, which is 80’s influenced EDM,

not unlike the Electroclash movement ten years back. I’ve also

entered a Tears For Fears remix contest on Beatport, and I’m

very pleased with my entry.

Is it hard to get gigs in Toronto?

Yes. There’s a surplus of DJ’s and only a handful of venues. It

was easier in the 90’s when there was at least one major rave

every weekend, and several other options at the same time.

Club owners and promoters tend to hire friends or family

rather than talented strangers. And if they do hire a stranger,

they’re more concerned about the bottom line than sponsoring

a creative endeavor. That’s also something that was better

back in the day. People would follow their hearts a little more.

To be fair, maybe it’s me. Marketing a unique sound can be

tough. It’s like showing everyone a platypus and saying “this is

the ideal pet for you”. It’s a tough sell.

What do you do to (survive) feed both your belly and your

musical passion?

I am determined. And I’m very excitable when it comes to new

sounds. Also I have a day job. It’s comforting to have a steady

income, benefits, and more job security than most.

How has the Toronto dance music scene evolved (or dissolved)

from when you got into DJing to the present culture?

When I started going to raves in ’92 it was ideal for someone

with a short attention span like myself. Every hour was a

different style. Then I watched as all the different camps

developed. Trance. Jungle. Happy Hardcore. For years it was

fractured. One scene would turn their nose up at another. But it

all seems to be coming back together again lately. Open format

is a little more accepted now. There was also the sea change

with the crackdown on warehouse parties. But even the more

alternative styles eventually found a home in the clubs.

What’s your favorite stuff to play right now?

I like variety more than any one style. And I love exposing

people to something new. I like the tech funk of Elite Force.

I like the Suicide Dub family of High Rankin, Hostage, and

Racknruin. I love the drumstep of Twisted Individual and

Urban Assault. And because of my natural urge to combine

songs, I love a good mash up. Colatron and The Reborn Identity

have kept me amused with mashes for quite some time. I think

mash ups are generally underrated in Toronto. That being

said, I think Girl Talk is overrated. I think a DJ should be able

to mix in key. And to not constantly resort to hip hop and R&B

samples.

How has Depeche Mode affected your life?

In an insidious way! As an impressionable youth in the 80’s I

appreciated their sense of style. Their fusion of Goth and synth

pop. Their two tone denim and leather look. Their beautiful

and quirky videos. I may enjoy more songs by The Smiths

or The Cure, but almost everything I listen to has strains of

Depeche Mode in it. I never intended to produce nine Depeche

Mode remixes / mashes, and yet they just came to me, one by

one.

Describe your personal creative process and how it

becomes something that you can put back out there?

I always say I use three ears when I listen to something. The

first is to decide if I like something or not. The second is for

deciding if anyone else will like it besides me, and what impact

it will have in a club. And the third is for figuring out what sort

of music it is and how it relates to other things I’ve collected.

How do you make a song yours, putting your magic and

unique touch on someone else’s composition?

Sometimes I’ll like most of a track, but not all of it. Or I think

it’s too leftfield to be effective in a club. If I think it’s worth my

time, I’ll make a custom edit / remix. That’s where those come

from. Then there’s the mash ups. I have a long list of songs

that remind me of other songs. They just jump out at me. But

when I remix a song I really have to focus on a theme or goal,

otherwise I would never finish. In any case, I often build a track

from front to back, like a DJ set. I think I generate the most

impact that way.

What distinguishes High Voltage from every other DJ?

I know the difference between what I like, and what other

people will probably like. I recognize that there’s sometimes

a difference between art and entertainment. But most of all, I

give a shit about what you want to hear. And I like to make an

impression.

Inspirations, interests outside of music?

None. Seriously though, I believe that laughter is the best

medicine, so comedy is a must. You can hear it in my sets, and

some of my productions. I love good food. If that makes me a

foodie then so be it. And science fiction. Because I’m not just a

music nerd. I’m all kinds of nerd!

How do you get a crowd going in a club, does it bug you

when people make requests?

Nostalgia is king. I like to play things that toy with everyone’s

collective memory. But I have to be careful not to insult those

memories! I actually like taking requests. Sometimes the

audience gives me a better idea than what I had in mind. But

I despise demands. There are always a few people who don’t

comprehend that there might be a certain theme for the night.

And there’s usually some jerk who will give me a lot of grief if I

don’t play their song.

Who is in your listening bag right now, anyone to watch out

for, exciting music trends?

There’s another revival in old rave sounds circa 1992-1994.

Part of it comes from hardcore artists who play at the Bang

Face parties in England like DJ Producer, Panacea and Luna

C. Part of it can be heard on new compilations from Intensive

Recordings. And still another part comes from the Future

Jungle movement by artists like DJ Fresh and 601.

If you could collaborate with any artist, who would it be?

I would love to produce The Prodigy… and of course Depeche

Mode. Locally I’d love to play with Marty McFly because of my

love for breaks. Also Denise Benson, because of her open minds

/ open format policy. The only party we played together was

actually a Surlygrrrl party! But that was ages ago.

Tell people one thing that they may not know about Jarod?

I was married at an Italian villa on a cliff overlooking the Indian

Ocean, near a small jungle village named Takaungu. I know

it sounds fantastic, but it’s true. I was married in Kenya, but

am once again single. Best wedding I’ve ever been to though.

Obviously.

Support Crowd funding for Typhoon Haiyan Victims here:

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Every year for at least the past 7 years, I have gone to see the English Beat whenever they play Toronto. It’s a spring ritual and the band, especially Dave Wakeling are always warm and welcoming to me and my friends. Over the years we have gotten to know (and love) Candy Kelii the lone woman on tour. Since, I have already interviewed Dave in the past, I thought it would be fun to interview Candy. Let me introduce her.

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Briefly describe your job with the Beat?

Merch queen/keeper of the shirts.

How did you get into this situation?

I was touring with a couple of other bands before The Beat. During time off from tour I’d try to make it to as many shows of theirs that I could. Went to a show at Angel stadium in ’07. Told Dave I was a merch girl who was heading to Europe the next day. 6 months later I was hired and the rest is history.

What is it like being the only women on a tour bus with a bunch of guys?

I actually don’t notice. I have a potty mouth and a weird sense of humor so it all works out just fine.

What do your parents think about what you do?

Haha, when I first started touring I didn’t tell my dad until the day before I left. At first he thought it was a joke and I was lying. Then he got really upset. I grew up in a family that when you leave the house you call when you get to your destination.  I think they were scared when they realized I’d be out in places in the world they’ve never been to. Now I’m gone so much they’re used to it. Our conversations are, “when are you leaving for tour again? Where are you going this time”. They think of it as just a normal every day job now. My grandparents actually call me more.

Does it get tiring, touring around and packing, unpacking….

I never unpack. I own 4 big suitcases and a handful of smaller ones. At least 3 of them contain clothes at all times. We do shows every weekend in California when we’re not on tour. When a tour comes back around I’m pretty much always packed.

How difficult is it to have a relationship when you are on the road so much?

Relationships are non existant. I’m gone too much. In the past I’ve gotten questions of, so when are you going to quit touring? I’ll choose touring.

What are your favorite places to play?

I like the Belly Up in Solana Beach CA. Nice room and the best staff.

Bimbo’s in San Francisco CA. There are a number of venues I really like. But I also like days off in cities or little towns that I’ve grown to love over the years.

What crazy things/bad things have happened on a tour?

Staff at a venue mistook me for someone else. I was put into a head lock while security attempted to yank me out of the venue. It ended where I had to slam a flat razor on the table to get the guy to go away.

Some random drunk dudes kept banging on the bus door because they wanted a fight for no good reason. Probably angry that they had to go home after the bar closed.

I fell in Spain and got my arm caught on a light fixture. I had to have my elbow stapled back on. There was so much blood. People at the hospital were moving away from me because they thought I had been shot.

A crowd got rowdy once in Whistler and these guys fell on me. My leg got stuck against the stage. I had to go to the hospital and have my knee put back into place.

I’m clumsy.

Future plans?

I own a merch company with my brother Jesse called Screen Dream Productions. So far everything has gone fantastic. We love it. We have great staff and clients. Our clients range from police, schools, bands, birthday parties. We make all the stuff you see at The English Beat shows.

What do you listen to when you are chilling?

My favorite band is The Monkees. I love Herman’s Hermits, Gary Lewis and the Playboys, Lou Christie, Dave Clark Five, Chubby Checker. Everything 60s. My favorite while I’m pulling tshirts in the trailer is New Vaudeville Band. Then I like stuff like TSOL, The Damned, Vibrators, Blur, Squeeze. Music of my teen years, Reggie and the Full Effect, Saves The Day, Get Up Kids, Hot Rod Cirucuit, One Man Army, Throw Rag, Death By Stereo that is still a big part of my life. Still love listening to my boys in The Briefs who were the first to take me on tour.

Do you get tired of hearing the band play night after night?

I’m disappointed when a venue puts me in the lobby. I hate being in a different room from the band. Especially when the lobby has the doors closed or they’re playing different music altogether. Then I’m stuck twiddling my thumbs.

How do you all get along?

We get along just fine. We have our moments on the bus where we all laugh about stuff or watch movies. Other then that we’re all doing our own thing to try and get ready for the show. I’m always worried about setting up and finding time to take a shower.

Is it challenging to stay healthy when you are on the road so much?

It’s hard to find time to exercise. If we have a day off in a town I like then I’m able to walk around all afternoon. Other then that I’ll just hope that lifting a ton of boxes in the trailer are keeping my muscles big and strong. Or the amounts of squats I do grabbing shirts all night is keeping my bum firm. Try to stock up on salads, fruits and veggies on the start of the tour.

What are your other interests?

I like watching skateboarding and bmx. Collecting clowns, records and Monkees stuff. I have two favorite artists that make a lot of clown stuff Ron Lee and Jim Koch. My room, the spare room and my vanity are all interesting little museums of my collections. Reading books of my favorite authors Rex Stout and Robert Wilson. Jay Baruchel and Eli Roth films. Trips to Disneyland and Universal Studios with my nephews and fam. My 2 dogs and 2 cats. I’m a simple girl, haha.